In South Korea, News Translation Draws Controversy May20

In South Korea, News...

  A new website that translates foreign news reports into Korean has stirred political controversy in South Korea. The foreign news articles that NewsPro (thenewspro.org) translates occasionally reveal events South Korean media have ignored. In January, for example, local villagers burned...

Foreign Business Reporting: The Next Trend in Chinese Press Restriction? Mar27

Foreign Business Rep...

In January 2014, Austin Ramzy joined dozens of  foreign correspondents from Reuters, Bloomberg, and The New York Times who have been denied Chinese visas or left perpetually waiting for renewals. The wave of denials follows a series of investigative stories, broken in the last 18 months, on...

Behind the Secrecy Shroud in North Korea Mar11

Behind the Secrecy Shroud in North Korea

North Korea is a country so shrouded in secrecy that even the most seemingly implausible stories can sometimes get traction in the news media.  “We know so little about what really happens inside the country, and especially inside the leader’s head, that very little is disprovable,” wrote Max Fisher of The Washington Post in a January article, examining the story that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had executed his uncle by feeding him to 120 hungry dogs. Fisher’s conclusion: “probably” not true. “There’s no other country to which we bring such a high degree of gullibility,” Fisher wrote. But now, several...

A Reprieve for Kenyan Journalists Mar10

A Reprieve for Kenyan Journalists

Kenyan journalists have won a temporary reprieve from two laws that they say would put significant new restrictions on media freedom by imposing a code of conduct written and enforced by a government-appointed panel. The laws, set for enactment early this year, were postponed in January when a court ordered a judicial review that could take several months to complete, according to journalists in Nairobi. Both laws passed swiftly through the Kenyan Parliament in late 2013, in the wake of government attacks on media for their reporting on how authorities handled last September’s siege at Nairobi’s Westgate Mall. But some journalists say...

In Indian democracy, free speech is at risk Apr08

In Indian democracy, free speech is at risk

At 2 a.m. on February 9, the Indian government declared a curfew in Indian-controlled Kashmir.A few hours later, Kashmiri residents understood why: New Delhi had decided to execute Afzal Guru, a Kashmiri convicted in a 2001 attack on the Indian Parliament. Guru’s hanging was the final act of a controversial case that India knew could spark street protests by many Kashmiris, who claimed charges against Guru were weak, and that he was used as a scapegoat. So once news of the hanging and the strict curfew—which forbade residents from even stepping out of their homes—was delivered by radio, television, and the Internet, New Delhi cut off...

America’s voice to the voiceless May10

America’s voice to the voiceless

In Ethiopia, the government controls all domestic media and blocks websites critical of those in power. One tactic for keeping media in line is imprisonment; the Committee to Protect Journalists calls Ethiopia one of the leading jailers of reporters on the continent. Threats and intimidation have forced more than 70 Ethiopian journalists into exile, where some write political blogs – whose words can’t be read in Ethiopia. That leaves Ethiopia’s 82 million people almost entirely cut off from independently reported news. “Besides what the government provides,” said Seeye Abraha, a former Ethiopian defense minister and current...

Media Controls Conti...

Al-Tahrir, CBC, Masr 25. These private television channels are among the many news media outlets that have sprung up in Egypt since the forced resignation of former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak early last year.  Opposition political figures who once had little or no access to the news...