Now UN Diplomats Fig...

Twitter fever has gone from the masses to Hollywood. Now global diplomats at the UN are the latest to be hit by the bug, creating new ways to cooperate–or jab each other. New media tools were for a long time used sparingly by foreign missions, usually to distribute official statements....

Al Jazeera, CNN and ...

In February, Tal Yehoshua Koren, wife of an Israeli Defense Ministry envoy in India, hopped into her car with the family’s driver. Shortly after they entered traffic,  a passing biker on a red motorcycle stuck a bomb on their Toyota Innova. The explosion injured Koren and her driver. Sound...

Global Fatigue Keeps...

The ongoing revolution in Syria erupted just over a year ago in March 2011.  Thousands of Syrians hit the streets to demand that President Bashar al-Assad step down, starting a bloody battle between the security forces and protesters. Violence escalated as the military bombarded rebel towns...

Russian media grapples with Syria

A small group of men armed with AK47s and hand-grenades attacks a government held checkpoint on a road that leads into the Syrian city of Homs.  One of their charges, a 23-year-old mechanic named Fouad Khashan, is shot and rushed to hospital. He dies en route. This story and the accompanying video came from a report by CBS’s Clarissa Ward in early February. Such images have been playing a critical role in influencing American public opinion about the Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad. So what then of the commensurate reports in Russia? Since Russia’s veto of the U.N. resolution to declare the al-Assad regime illegitimate,...

Media Controls Conti...

Al-Tahrir, CBC, Masr 25. These private television channels are among the many news media outlets that have sprung up in Egypt since the forced resignation of former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak early last year.  Opposition political figures who once had little or no access to the news...

The Media, Terrorism...

Iranian nuclear scientist Mostafa Ahmadi Roshan in January was killed in Tehran by a bomb attached to his car.  In the tense international atmosphere over Iran’s nuclear program, the way in which different news outlets covered the assassination reflected national attitudes towards Iran, and...

Hamas-Fatah divide i...

The political fracturing in Gaza and the West Bank, with Hamas and Fatah competing for power, has spread to other institutions – including journalism. This divide has made it extremely difficult for local journalists to report local news and Palestinians are now increasingly looking for...

Charles Sennott on International Reporting

Charlie Sennott has worked as a foreign correspondent for the last 25 years, traveling to over 15 countries including England, Israel, Afghanistan and Egypt. He’s also the vice president, co-founder and executive editor of GlobalPost. The website began out of the collapse of the newspaper industry and resulting closure of many international bureaus. GlobalPost currently has correspondents in more than 50 countries and has roughly 2 million unique visitors per month. Its goal is to bring original content from all corners of the world to the American public. Produced for Columbia News Tonight. Annie Claire Bergeron-Oliver is a student at...

5 Minutes with Mohammed Omer

Described as “the voice of the voiceless,” Mohammed Omer won a Martha Gelhorn award for his reporting in Gaza. Dalal Mawad sat with Omer to talk about the difficulties and challenges of being a freelance journalist. Produced for Columbia News Tonight. Dalal Mawad is a student at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She can be reached on Twitter (@dalalmawad).

An Assignment Worse Than Hell

Syria’s 544-mile border with Turkey has long been a common path for illegal entry or exit. These days, that border has drawn a new group of illegal entrants to Syria: foreign correspondents covering a nearly year-old conflict that seems to grow bloodier by the week. As the civil war in Syria intensifies, it has become the only pathway foreign journalists can use to sneak in under the nose of Syrian authorities who are determined to keep out foreign press. Very few visas are granted to the foreign correspondents — which is why reporters from the BBC, the New York Times, CBS, and other news outlets have taken the clandestine...