Crossed Wires? How the media in the U.S. and Pakistan are fraying an already rocky relationship. May12

Crossed Wires? How the media in the U.S. and Pakis...

When U.S. Navy Seals slipped through the dark into Osama bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound one year ago, the killing of America’s most wanted man on Pakistani soil set off a tidal wave of media coverage in both countries that helped shape public opinion and complicated already frayed relations between Washington and Islamabad The killing of Osama bin Laden became a media moment in both countries, though one with sharply differing narratives. U.S. media coverage featured triumphant fist pumping outside the White House, recreations of how the Navy Seals found their target, and TV commentators – especially those on the right of the...

No Party Line in Chinese News Media On Republican Primaries May12

No Party Line in Chinese News Media On Republican ...

China and the United States share a history muddled by mistrust. This is especially true today with respect to each country’s economic and political ambitions. The news media in one is influenced by its nation’s politics, culture and history in reporting on the other. Yet, despite these restrictions and sometimes-tense national relationship, the way that the Xinhua News Agency, China Central Television and the South China Morning Post covered the U.S. Republican primaries showed remarkable variety in their attitude towards American politics. This is an analysis of Chinese media coverage of this year’s Republican Primaries, from January...

The Transition of Myanmar in the Chinese and U.S. News Media May11

The Transition of Myanmar in the Chinese and U.S. ...

When opposition leader and activist Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s National Democratic League swept parliamentary elections in Myanmar early last month, it sent a message abroad: Myanmar is changing. The American and Chinese media, like their governments, appear to agree that those changes are for the good — but with different national frames. Only days before the landmark election, the Association of Southeast Nations applauded reforms in the country and urged Western nations to lift sanctions “immediately.” China, too, supported immediate action on the part of Western nations. The U.S. has responded by easing some sanctions, and leaving...

China’s Internet Coup: Is It A Possibility? May10

China’s Internet Coup: Is It A Possibility?

It started with the peculiar death of an English businessman in a hotel room in the city of Chongqing. It has descended into an epochal political crisis that threatens the stability of a country on the brink of its once-in-a-decade leadership transition. Bo Xilai, one of the most prominent politicians in China and previously considered a likely candidate to join the nine-member Politburo Standing Committee, was removed from his post as the Chongqing party chief. His wife, Gu Kailai, is under investigation for the murder of the businessman, Neil Heywood. Emerging details of the death are becoming increasingly salacious, with Boxun, a...

US and Pakistani Media Split Over Balochistan May08

US and Pakistani Med...

Republican Congressman Dana Rohrabacher in February held a hearing of the Foreign Affairs Sub-Committee on Oversight and Investigations, which he chairs.  The subject might have seemed a bit strange for most Americans.  It was on the right to self-determination for the people of...

With Putin Back as President, Media Play the Cold War Card May07

With Putin Back as President, Media Play the Cold ...

As Vladimir V. Putin once again assumes the Russian presidency, the expectation in the Western media appears to be that Putin will set a markedly different tone from Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev—one that torpedoes Russia’s re-set with the U.S., and infuses the countries’ relationship with a Soviet-style tension. After the Cold War ended in 1991, a new era of reconciliation between the two two superpowers began haltingly under President Boris Yeltsin.  Then, the 21st century brought the first Putin presidency and with it old fears of the Cold War. The ascension to the presidency of his more diplomatic partner Medvedev between 2008...

Russian media grapples with Syria

A small group of men armed with AK47s and hand-grenades attacks a government held checkpoint on a road that leads into the Syrian city of Homs.  One of their charges, a 23-year-old mechanic named Fouad Khashan, is shot and rushed to hospital. He dies en route. This story and the accompanying video came from a report by CBS’s Clarissa Ward in early February. Such images have been playing a critical role in influencing American public opinion about the Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad. So what then of the commensurate reports in Russia? Since Russia’s veto of the U.N. resolution to declare the al-Assad regime illegitimate,...

‘Netizens’ Pry Open Censorship in China May07

‘Netizens̵...

When suddenly Chinese had access to President Barack Obama’s Google+ account in February, some 600 messages poured in. Some asked the American president to clarify the mysterious circumstances surrounding a former police chief who had taken refuge in a U.S. consulate because of corruption...

Dueling Narratives May03

Dueling Narratives

On May 1, 2011, President Barack Obama announced to the world that Osama Bin Laden had been killed by U.S. forces in Pakistan. One year later, Global Newsroom looks back at how the story was reported in U.S. and Pakistani media. The dueling narratives, with some sharply differing focus points, help explain the tensions the operation created — tensions that continue today in U.S.-Pakistani relations. Céleste Owen-Jones is a student at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She can be reached on Twitter (@CelesteOJ). Sarah Alvi is a student at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She can be reached on Twitter...

Free Enough? Apr30

Free Enough?

When Aung San Suu Kyi and the National League for Democracy won 43 seats in the Myanmar parliamentary by-election on April 1, the streets of Yangon erupted in celebration. “It was a wild party,” says NPR correspondent Anthony Kuhn, who traveled to Myanmar from Indonesia to cover the...