One Attack, Two Stories: Nationalism in Indian and Pakistani Media Mar18

One Attack, Two Stories: Nationalism in Indian and...

    A January attack on an airbase in Pathankot, an Indian city close to the Pakistani border, marked 2016’s first salvo in the decades-long, sometimes violent India-Pakistan conflict. The English-language press in both countries covered the story extensively. But an analysis of that coverage shows that the stories on both sides were told through nationalist filters, reflecting the deep animosities that have existed for decades since the two countries were partitioned. “When we cover India and Pakistan relations” in a time of conflict, “there is an automatic precautionary approach,” said Abdul Manan, a journalist at...

Malala Yousafzai – A polarizing figure in Pakistani Media Mar15

Malala Yousafzai – A polarizing figure in Pakistan...

    On Feb. 7, Dr. Danish, the host of Pakistan’s popular Urdu-language talk show “Ye Sawal Hai” (The Question is), was in full shouting form. “This is the photograph of Waleed Khan who took eight bullets,” he yelled, pointing at the split screen flashing the photographs of a 14-year-old boy alongside Malala Yousafzai. Khan is a survivor of the Pakistani Taliban’s Dec. 2014 attack on the Army Public School in Peshawar, Pakistan. He was in the headlines for his ambitions to join the army to avenge his friends. “And this,” he screamed, “is the photograph of Malala Yousafzai, who took one bullet and is living out of...

In South Korea, News Translation Draws Controversy May20

In South Korea, News...

  A new website that translates foreign news reports into Korean has stirred political controversy in South Korea. The foreign news articles that NewsPro (thenewspro.org) translates occasionally reveal events South Korean media have ignored. In January, for example, local villagers burned...

Foreign Business Reporting: The Next Trend in Chinese Press Restriction? Mar27

Foreign Business Rep...

In January 2014, Austin Ramzy joined dozens of  foreign correspondents from Reuters, Bloomberg, and The New York Times who have been denied Chinese visas or left perpetually waiting for renewals. The wave of denials follows a series of investigative stories, broken in the last 18 months, on...

Behind the Secrecy Shroud in North Korea Mar11

Behind the Secrecy Shroud in North Korea

North Korea is a country so shrouded in secrecy that even the most seemingly implausible stories can sometimes get traction in the news media.  “We know so little about what really happens inside the country, and especially inside the leader’s head, that very little is disprovable,” wrote Max Fisher of The Washington Post in a January article, examining the story that North Korean leader Kim Jong Un had executed his uncle by feeding him to 120 hungry dogs. Fisher’s conclusion: “probably” not true. “There’s no other country to which we bring such a high degree of gullibility,” Fisher wrote. But now, several...

Pakistan state TV tries its hand at English broadcasts Apr09

Pakistan state TV tries its hand at English broadc...

With the slogan ‘Changing Perspectives’ and a goal of presenting Pakistan to the rest of the world as a vibrant, modern Islamic state, state-owned Pakistan Television Network at the end of January launched a 24-hour English-language news channel called PTV World. Amid the fanfare in the launch, there was no mention that PTV World is the fourth such broadcasting attempt in Pakistan  – or that the previous three, all failed financially. The earlier failures may not offer much guidance on how well the state’s service will perform, though. Each was an attempt by a private broadcaster to build an advertising base that would...

The Scary Implications of Digital Espionage For Jo...

When the New York Times revealed in late January that Chinese hackers had infiltrated its digital network, including reporters’ email accounts, reaction exploded on Twitter and other social media sites. People speculated that this was yet another example of China’s rising power in the world. But then there was this tweet from writer and reporter Charlie Custer, who manages the translation website ChinaGeeks.com. On the one hand, NYT hacking is a big story. On the other hand, is it? Isn’t this happening to most foreign correspondents constantly? — Charlie Custer (@ChinaGeeks) February 1, 2013 That reminded Howard French, the...

In Indian democracy, free speech is at risk Apr08

In Indian democracy, free speech is at risk

At 2 a.m. on February 9, the Indian government declared a curfew in Indian-controlled Kashmir.A few hours later, Kashmiri residents understood why: New Delhi had decided to execute Afzal Guru, a Kashmiri convicted in a 2001 attack on the Indian Parliament. Guru’s hanging was the final act of a controversial case that India knew could spark street protests by many Kashmiris, who claimed charges against Guru were weak, and that he was used as a scapegoat. So once news of the hanging and the strict curfew—which forbade residents from even stepping out of their homes—was delivered by radio, television, and the Internet, New Delhi cut off...

Myanmar Media: Still Freer, But Far From Free Mar12

Myanmar Media: Still Freer, But Far From Free

More than a year after Myanmar’s authoritarian regime began enacting broad political reforms – including easing harsh restrictions on media — early euphoria is beginning to give way to caution and skepticism. Among the high-profile changes that have won praise from western governments was the announcement that a new media law would be drafted by a press council, made up of 28 non-government experts. Although the law would need approval in the national parliament, allowing civilian experts to propose how they should be governed was unprecedented in Myanmar, which was ruled for decades by military dictators..  It’s one of the...

CCTV: Coming to America

In February, China Central Television launched CCTV America, an hour-long daily program broadcast from brand new studios in Washington, D.C. CCTV America says that it is trying to provide American audiences with news from an Asian perspective. However, some critics are skeptical that the network will be able to distance itself from the propaganda broadcast by its Chinese relative. Milos Balac, Annie Claire Bergeron-Oliver and Lesley Dong report.