Life in Exile for Latin American Journalists Mar24

Life in Exile for Latin American Journalists

  The afternoon of March 19, 2003 is seared into the memory of Cuban economist and independent journalist Alfredo Felipe. That was the day government officials invaded his house in Artemisa, a town 60 kilometers west of Havana. “A horrible circus,” Felipe recalled, in a recent phone interview from his current home in Austin, Texas. “They took my books, all my books, an important number of books. They took my papers, a typewriter from the year 1929, a tape recorder — all those things that are useful to transmit ideas. Those were the weapons they were looking for.” Felipe was one of 75 opposition figures rounded up that...

Mexican journalists mount online defiance Mar19

Mexican journalists mount online defiance

  To be a journalist in Mexico today is to be faced with a constant dilemma—to publish or not. Publishing stories that expose the actions of drug cartels can bring death. Unmasking the truth about corrupt politicians can be equally risky. The fear of retribution means journalists in Mexico self-censor their material. In the wake of this reality, non-traditional efforts – Mexicans using blogs, Twitter hashtags, and Facebook groups to disseminate information – have sought to fill the journalism gap. #ReynosaFollow and Blog del Narco are among the examples that have come and gone, often under threat from drug cartels, and questioned...

Obama’s trip to Cuba and the censorship dilemma Mar19

Obama’s trip to Cuba and the censorship dilemma

      On March 21, when President Obama becomes the first sitting U.S. president to visit Cuba in 88 years, every step of his trip will be scrutinized, praised, or criticized by politicians, pundits – and by journalists both inside and outside the country. In announcing his historic trip, Obama stated on his personal Twitter account that he would personally raise human rights with the Cuban government. “America will always stand for human rights around the world,” he Tweeted. For some journalists working in the island’s highly restricted media, Obama’s trip raises hopes that freedom of the press is high on his human...

One Attack, Two Stories: Nationalism in Indian and Pakistani Media Mar18

One Attack, Two Stories: Nationalism in Indian and...

    A January attack on an airbase in Pathankot, an Indian city close to the Pakistani border, marked 2016’s first salvo in the decades-long, sometimes violent India-Pakistan conflict. The English-language press in both countries covered the story extensively. But an analysis of that coverage shows that the stories on both sides were told through nationalist filters, reflecting the deep animosities that have existed for decades since the two countries were partitioned. “When we cover India and Pakistan relations” in a time of conflict, “there is an automatic precautionary approach,” said Abdul Manan, a journalist at...

In the midst of a media blackout, Burundians turn to WhatsApp for information Mar15

In the midst of a media blackout, Burundians turn ...

    Burundi’s radio stations, traditionally the most popular source for news in the East African country, have been all but shut down since a failed coup last May. In the wake of the coup attempt, President Pierre Nkurunziza cracked down on the independent press, including the country’s “big four” independent channels: Radio Publique Africaine (RPA), Radio Bonesha, Radio Isanganiro and Radio Télé Renaissance. All were destroyed by presidential loyalists on May 14, forcing journalists into exile and plunging Burundi into a media blackout. Radio Isanganiro was allowed to resume broadcasting on February 19 alongside Rema FM,...

Malala Yousafzai – A polarizing figure in Pakistani Media Mar15

Malala Yousafzai – A polarizing figure in Pakistan...

    On Feb. 7, Dr. Danish, the host of Pakistan’s popular Urdu-language talk show “Ye Sawal Hai” (The Question is), was in full shouting form. “This is the photograph of Waleed Khan who took eight bullets,” he yelled, pointing at the split screen flashing the photographs of a 14-year-old boy alongside Malala Yousafzai. Khan is a survivor of the Pakistani Taliban’s Dec. 2014 attack on the Army Public School in Peshawar, Pakistan. He was in the headlines for his ambitions to join the army to avenge his friends. “And this,” he screamed, “is the photograph of Malala Yousafzai, who took one bullet and is living out of...

Covering ISIS

Only a handful of journalists have gone into ISIS territory and come out alive to report about it. The group’s brutal tactics and its history of violence against journalists mean that most of what the world learns about ISIS, and about life inside the territory it controls, comes from nontraditional reporting – often citizen journalism videos, photos, and dispatches. ISIS itself actively uses social media networks to promote its ideas and to recruit supporters. Twitter has long been a favored ISIS platform, though in early February Twitter announced it had suspended more than 125,000 accounts for ISIS-related promotions of terrorism...