Mightier Than the Sword: Political Cartoons in the...

“The best way to escape every day reality is to see cartoons,” says Palestinian journalist Mohammed Omer. But cartoonists in the Middle East don’t just entertain. At times, their work is the only way to openly express dissent, in a region where press freedoms remain endangered . Using symbols and allegory to make their point, sometimes cartoonists are the only ones whose message can pass through the censorship. The first images of Syrian political cartoonist Ali Ferzat after he was attacked in Damascus last year showed him lying in a hospital bed with large bruises on his face – and, most tellingly, with his badly broken...

CCTV: Coming to America

In February, China Central Television launched CCTV America, an hour-long daily program broadcast from brand new studios in Washington, D.C. CCTV America says that it is trying to provide American audiences with news from an Asian perspective. However, some critics are skeptical that the network will be able to distance itself from the propaganda broadcast by its Chinese relative. Milos Balac, Annie Claire Bergeron-Oliver and Lesley Dong report.

Crossed Wires? How the media in the U.S. and Pakistan are fraying an already rocky relationship. May12

Crossed Wires? How the media in the U.S. and Pakis...

When U.S. Navy Seals slipped through the dark into Osama bin Laden’s Abbottabad compound one year ago, the killing of America’s most wanted man on Pakistani soil set off a tidal wave of media coverage in both countries that helped shape public opinion and complicated already frayed relations between Washington and Islamabad The killing of Osama bin Laden became a media moment in both countries, though one with sharply differing narratives. U.S. media coverage featured triumphant fist pumping outside the White House, recreations of how the Navy Seals found their target, and TV commentators – especially those on the right of the...

No Party Line in Chinese News Media On Republican Primaries May12

No Party Line in Chinese News Media On Republican ...

China and the United States share a history muddled by mistrust. This is especially true today with respect to each country’s economic and political ambitions. The news media in one is influenced by its nation’s politics, culture and history in reporting on the other. Yet, despite these restrictions and sometimes-tense national relationship, the way that the Xinhua News Agency, China Central Television and the South China Morning Post covered the U.S. Republican primaries showed remarkable variety in their attitude towards American politics. This is an analysis of Chinese media coverage of this year’s Republican Primaries, from January...

Looking For The Real Africa in Western Media Coverage May11

Looking For The Real...

“I can’t find a normal picture of Africa!” wailed Rebecca Moundio, an assistant editor for Africa Renewal, a magazine covering economic issues on the continent. Sifting through a database of images captured in various African countries, all she could find were pictures of children with...

The Transition of Myanmar in the Chinese and U.S. News Media May11

The Transition of Myanmar in the Chinese and U.S. ...

When opposition leader and activist Daw Aung San Suu Kyi’s National Democratic League swept parliamentary elections in Myanmar early last month, it sent a message abroad: Myanmar is changing. The American and Chinese media, like their governments, appear to agree that those changes are for the good — but with different national frames. Only days before the landmark election, the Association of Southeast Nations applauded reforms in the country and urged Western nations to lift sanctions “immediately.” China, too, supported immediate action on the part of Western nations. The U.S. has responded by easing some sanctions, and leaving...

America’s View on Af...

The 17 Afghan civilians allegedly shot and burned in March by American soldier Robert Bales strained relations between the United States and Afghanistan.  The media framing of the event—and the search for answers behind it—also has been very different between the two countries.  While...

Venezuela Journalists Demand More Public Media May10

Venezuela Journalist...

On the tenth anniversary of the attempted coup against President Hugo Chavez in Venezuela, the questions of media freedom and access remain contradictory and polemic. State-run and private media both exist, but have a hostile relationship. It seems that the next frontier of the battle between...

America’s voice to the voiceless May10

America’s voice to the voiceless

In Ethiopia, the government controls all domestic media and blocks websites critical of those in power. One tactic for keeping media in line is imprisonment; the Committee to Protect Journalists calls Ethiopia one of the leading jailers of reporters on the continent. Threats and intimidation have forced more than 70 Ethiopian journalists into exile, where some write political blogs – whose words can’t be read in Ethiopia. That leaves Ethiopia’s 82 million people almost entirely cut off from independently reported news. “Besides what the government provides,” said Seeye Abraha, a former Ethiopian defense minister and current...

China’s Internet Coup: Is It A Possibility? May10

China’s Internet Coup: Is It A Possibility?

It started with the peculiar death of an English businessman in a hotel room in the city of Chongqing. It has descended into an epochal political crisis that threatens the stability of a country on the brink of its once-in-a-decade leadership transition. Bo Xilai, one of the most prominent politicians in China and previously considered a likely candidate to join the nine-member Politburo Standing Committee, was removed from his post as the Chongqing party chief. His wife, Gu Kailai, is under investigation for the murder of the businessman, Neil Heywood. Emerging details of the death are becoming increasingly salacious, with Boxun, a...